Management & Development Center

                  

 About Us | Our Services | Training | Consulting |

M&DC / OEE /

عربى

Introduction to OEE

 

Contents

1. Definitions

  • OEE is a comprehensive metric that indicates the relative productivity of a piece of equipment, a work cell, or an entire production line compared to its theoretical performance.

  • It is particularly important for bottleneck equipment as it identifies areas critical for the improvement of equipment productivity.

  • The OEE measure helps improve productivity by helping staff identify and progressively eliminate the factors which reduce the OEE measure

  • Many manufacturers who implement a serious OEE improvement effort achieve a 4 to 10% OEE improvement in the first year.

  • The OEE ratio is calculated as:

OEE = Availability x Performance Rate x Quality Rate

  • OEE visualizes where to look for hidden capacity. Most machines run at 35 to 45% of their theoretical maximum capacity. If we consider 85% to be a realistic target, this means most equipment can produce twice as many good product as it does now, at the same (and even less) cost. 

http://www.oeetoolkit.nl/community/

2. OEE  & The Six Big Losses of TPM

Availability

  1. Equipment Failure and Breakdowns

  2. Set-ups and Adjustments

Performance

  1. Idling and Minor Stops

  2. Reduced Speed

Quality

  1. Reduced Yield

  2. Scrap

3. Uptime/ OEE/ Asset Utilization Model

  • Asset utilization rate—That percentage of ideal rate at which a plant operates in a given time period. The time period recommended is 8,760 hours per year, but this can be defined as any period, depending on how market losses are treated.

  • Uptime or Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)—That percentage of ideal rate at which a plant operates in a given time period, plus the time for no-market-demand losses.

  • Quality Utilization—That percentage of ideal rate at which a plant operates in a given time period, plus market demand losses, and changeover and transition losses.

  • Potential Rate Utilization—That percentage of ideal rate at which a plant operates in a given time period, plus market demand losses, changeover and transition losses, and quality losses.

  • Availability—That period of time the plant is available to run at any rate.

  • These terms can be confusing, depending upon any individual’s experience base—hence the effort to define them. For example, many people refer to uptime as any time a line or plant is up and running.

Source: www.reliabilityweb.com/excerpts/ excerpts/01Making%20Common%20Sense.pdf